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PUBLICATIONID : 16490
PUBLICATIONTYPE : 1
TYPE : Article
TITLE : Bringing society back into the climate debate
ORIG_TITLE : Bringing society back into the climate debate
AUTHOR : Pielke, RA and D Sarewitz
FIRST_AUTHOR : Pielke, RA and D Sarewitz
AUTHOR_COUNT : 1
ADDRESS : Arizona State Univ, Ctr Sci Policy & Outcomes, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA; Univ Colorado, Ctr Sci & Technol Policy Res, Boulder, CO 80309 USA
PUBLISHER : KLUWER ACADEMIC-HUMAN SCIENCES PRESS
FIRSTAUTHOREMPLOYER : 3
ABBREV_JOURNAL : Popul. Env.
BEGINPAGE : 255
ENDPAGE : 268
VOLUME : 26
ISSUE : 3
PUBLISH_DATE : JAN
YEAR : 2005
URL : http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/admin/publication_files/2010.28.pdf
REFEREED : 1
RESOURCE : WOS:000227913700005
CITATION : 30
DEPT : CSTPR
LAST_UPDATED : 2017-05-24 12:54:16
ISSN : 0199-0039
IDS : 910ER
DOI : 10.1007/s11111-005-1877-6
ABSTRACT : Debate over climate change focuses narrowly on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. A common justification for such emissions reductions is that they will lead to a reduction in the future impacts of climate on society. But research from social scientists and others who study environment-society interactions clearly indicates that the dominant factors shaping the impacts of climate on society are societal. A greater appreciation for this body of research would allow for consideration of a broader base of policy options to respond to the challenges of climate change, as well as the composition of climate research portfolios more likely to contribute useful knowledge to decision makers.
KEYWORDS : climate change; policy; disasters; extreme events; demographics
KEYWORD_PLUS : UNITED-STATES
AREA : Demography; Environmental Sciences & Ecology
FIRST_AUTHOR_EMAIL : pielke@colorado.edu; dsarewitz@asu.edu
PUBLICATION : POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT
PLACE : NEW YORK
LANGUAGE : English
SERIAL : 16490
PAGES : 255-268
APPROVED : yes
SERIES_VOLUME_NUMERIC : 1
ONLINE_PUBLICATION : no
VERSION : 1
FIRST_AUTHOR_ADDRESS : Pielke, RA (reprint author), Arizona State Univ, Ctr Sci Policy & Outcomes, Tempe, AZ 85287 USA.
AUTHOR_OTHER_FORM : Pielke, RA; Sarewitz, D
REFERENCES_NUM : 26
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PUBLISHER_ADDRESS : 233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013-1578 USA
COUNT : 1
VETTED : 1