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PUBLICATIONID : 7286
PUBLICATIONTYPE : 1
TYPE : Article
TITLE : Normalized hurricane damages in the United States: 1925-95
ORIG_TITLE : Normalized hurricane damages in the United States: 1925-95
AUTHOR : Pielke, RA and CW Landsea
FIRST_AUTHOR : Pielke, RA and CW Landsea
AUTHOR_COUNT : 1
ADDRESS : Natl Ctr Atmospher Res, Environm & Soc Impacts Grp, Boulder, CO 80307 USA; NOAA, Atlantic Oceanog & Meteorol Lab, Hurricane Res Div, Miami, FL 33149 USA
PUBLISHER : AMER METEOROLOGICAL SOC
FIRSTAUTHOREMPLOYER : 3
ABBREV_JOURNAL : Weather Forecast.
BEGINPAGE : 621
ENDPAGE : 631
VOLUME : 13
ISSUE : 3
PUBLISH_DATE : SEP
YEAR : 1998
URL : http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/publications/special/normalized_hurricane_damages.html
REFEREED : 1
RESOURCE : WOS:000076513400002
CITATION : 170
DEPT : CSTPR
LAST_UPDATED : 2016-07-29 08:43:18
ISSN : 0882-8156
IDS : 130HD
DOI : 10.1175/1520-0434(1998)013<0621:NHDITU>2.0.CO;2
ABSTRACT : Hurricanes are the costliest natural disasters in the United States. Understanding how both hurricane frequencies and intensities vary from year to year as well as how this is manifested in changes in damages that occur is a topic of great interest to meteorologists, public and private decision makers, and the general public alike. Previous research into long-term trends in hurricane-caused damage along the U.S. coast has suggested that damage has been quickly increasing within the last two decades, even after considering inflation. However, to best capture the year-to-year variability in tropical cyclone damage, consideration must also be given toward two additional factors: coastal population changes and changes in wealth. Both population and wealth have increased dramatically over the last several decades and act to enhance the recent hurricane damages preferentially over those occurring previously. More appropriate trends in the United States hurricane damages can be calculated when a normalization of the damages are done to take into account inflation and changes in coastal population and wealth. With this normalization, the trend of increasing damage amounts in recent decades disappears. Instead, substantial multidecadal variations in normalized damages are observed: the 1970s and 1980s actually incurred less damages than in the preceding few decades. Only during the early 1990s does damage approach the high level of impact seen back in the 1940s through the 1960s, showing that what has been observed recently is not unprecedented. Over the long term, the average annual impact of damages in the continental United States is about $4.8 billion (1995 $), substantially more than previous estimates. Of these damages, over 83% are accounted for by the intense hurricanes (Saffir-Simpson categories 3, 4, and 5), yet these make up only 21% of the U.S.-landfalling tropical cyclones.
KEYWORD_PLUS : ATLANTIC HURRICANES; INSURANCE INDUSTRY; INTENSE
AREA : Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
PUBLICATION : WEATHER AND FORECASTING
PLACE : BOSTON
LANGUAGE : English
SERIAL : 7286
PAGES : 621-631
APPROVED : yes
SERIES_VOLUME_NUMERIC : 1
ONLINE_PUBLICATION : no
VERSION : 1
FIRST_AUTHOR_ADDRESS : Pielke, RA (reprint author), Natl Ctr Atmospher Res, Environm & Soc Impacts Grp, POB 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 USA
AUTHOR_OTHER_FORM : Pielke, RA; Landsea, CW
REFERENCES_NUM : 23
PUBLISHER_ADDRESS : 45 BEACON ST, BOSTON, MA 02108-3693 USA
COUNT : 1