Lisa Dilling

Projects

Advancing the Use of Drought Early Warning Systems in the Upper Colorado River Basin

The largely rural Western Slope of Colorado encompasses much of the headwaters of the Colorado River, a critical regional water resource used to meet multiple demands across a landscape that is frequently subject to drought. Water managers and users in this region rely on snowpack as a form of seasonal water storage as well as an indicator of drought. Climate change projections indicate that the regional warming trend will continue, causing the snowpack to melt earlier and produce less runoff for the same precipitation input, and potentially reducing its utility as a drought indicator. Read more ...

Balancing Severe Decision Conflicts under Climate Extremes in Water Resource Management

Colorado Front RangeOver the past several years there have been increasing calls for decision support tools in the area of climate and acknowledgement that changing extremes add to an already challenging decision environment for water managers. Recurring droughts, flood events, and concerns over extreme events in the future have created a strong interest among water managers in the Front Range of Colorado about how to plan in the face of these extremes. Traditional methods of identifying alternatives for water supply management may not fully capture the range of existing preferred alternatives, meaning that utilities may miss some of the solutions that appropriately balance among tradeoffs. Read more ...

 

Interactions of Drought and Climate Adaptation (IDCA) for Urban Water

waterThis project, funded by the NOAA Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP), examined how drought policies interact with both short-term drought and long-term climate change. It asked whether adjustment today or in the past leads to more resilient systems across climate time scales. The project focused on urban water systems across the US and how they responded to drought. Researchers then used a looked for patterns in those responses to understand how such drought policies prepare cities for the adaptation challenge of the future. Read more ...

 

Knowledge, Power and the Coproduction of Climate Information for Adaptation to Climate Change in Tanzania

Knowledge, Power and the Coproduction of Climate Information for Adaptation to Climate Change in TanzaniaLisa Dilling, Meaghan Daly, Mara Goldman and Eric Lovell are conducting a project that aims to improve understanding of processes to effectively link climate information and adaptation at national and local scales in Tanzania. The approach is to explicitly recognize and examine the ways in which the varying epistemological traditions and relations of power among vulnerable communities, disaster management professionals, and climate experts influence the perceived value of climate information for improved early warning and climate adaptation. Read more ...

 

Making Sense of Climate Engineering

Knowledge, Power and the Coproduction of Climate Information for Adaptation to Climate Change in TanzaniaClimate engineering (CE) refers to technologies for large-scale, deliberate manipulation of the Earth’s climate by either removing greenhouse gases from the air or by applying solar reflective approaches in order to avoid an escalating global warming. It includes a wide range of proposed methods such as ocean fertilization, space mirrors, air capture, injecting sulfur aerosols into the stratosphere, and enhancing marine-cloud reflectivity. These methods vary greatly in their technical aspects, scope in time and space, potential environmental impacts, timescales of operation and the legal, ethical, and governance issues that they pose. Read more ...

 

Understanding the Drivers of Adaptation at the Municipal Level in CO, WY and UT

MountainsLisa Dilling is co-leading this WWA-funded project to investigate why some local decision makers choose to adapt to climate-related stress and risk while others do not. Our idea is to systematically investigate the conditions under which local decision-makers in cities and large towns in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming decide to adapt (or not) to increased climate-related risk and hazards.
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